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Why Consider Home Care as a Career?

We live in an unusual time. With the most noteworthy joblessness rate since the Great Depression, it is a time of uncertainty for several individuals and families. As we all try to stay safe amongst COVID-19, the added stress of financial and career uncertainty can be overwhelming.

For those of you who are struggling financially right now or have lost your job and are not sure what to do, we suggest considering a career in home care.

We all are having to deal with sheltering in place and staying home as necessary. But, for older ones and others at high risk, staying home could mean their life. As we continue to battle this virus, any other health challenges people are facing unfortunately remain. Particularly for seniors, small tasks around the house, picking up groceries, and getting to medical appointments are especially difficult.

Trusted home care professionals are keeping these ones safe, happy, and healthy at home, and are relieving stress and burdens for the families of those needing extra care. So, whether you are working in healthcare, or you are seeking to transition from another field, a career in home care is particularly gratifying.

Current Healthcare Workers
All those working in doctor’s offices, hospitals, and clinics. We know that your jobs are now more stressful than ever. Yet, your desire to help people is just as strong. Here are a couple of reasons why a becoming a caregiver may be appropriate for you:

Flexibility- Perhaps you have family members to take care of, or maybe you just need more control over your schedule. When working in home care, you can often set your schedule to make certain that you can take care of the important matters in your life.
A change in scenery- We cannot imagine all that you have seen and dealt with at this time we are living in. It is more than understandable if you are burned out. Whether you are burned out, or simply need a change in scenery, making the switch to home care offers a new way to use the skills and training you have acquired during your career.
A closer relationship with your patient- Many nurses feel that it is rewarding to provide long-term care for patients. In a home care career, you will be joining your patients in their homes. You will get to know them and get to see their successes and help them when things become challenging.
Develop skills- Here at Help Home Care, our employees continue to develop existing skills, as well as learn new ones. You will have plenty of opportunities to grow.

Career Changers
Hospitality, retail, and other industries have taken a massive hit as the world faces the COVID-19 pandemic. A new career in home care as a caregiver is perfect for those who are interested in transitioning to an exciting, and rewarding role. It is an especially good fit for those who enjoy working with people. Why?

You Get to Make a difference- Every job is important, but it is incredibly rewarding to be personally involved in the health and happiness of those who need our help. The help of a caregiver keeps many older ones happy, healthy, and comfortable at home, rather than in a nursing home.
No day is the same- When you have a career in home care, every day is different. Your workplace is the home of your clients. Rather than having to sit in front of a screen all day, you are on the road and visiting with client patients, chatting about their day, and making a major impact.
Companionship in a time of physical distancing- The effects of the current pandemic have come down especially hard on all of us who are physically distancing from friends and loved ones. Not only will you be providing companionship to seniors who are often lonely, but the company of your clients will also be good for your mental health.

Join HHC and you will become part of a passionate group of home care providers who genuinely care about having a positive influence on the people in our communities. We would love to have you on our team.

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Home Care Services Over Nursing Home Placement

It is normal to experience a level of stress as your parents begin to age. Their health condition worsens, their bodies grow weaker and their memory may begin to fade. They become more susceptible to accidents and injuries. At some point, searching for senior care options becomes necessary. As a capable son or daughter who deeply loves their parents, you might want to deal with the issue yourself. However, it may not be practical or possible for you to do so. What can you do to see to it your aging parents receive the care they need?

Oftentimes, families facing these circumstances have felt that they had no other choice but to place their loved ones in a nursing home facility. While this option may be appropriate for some, many of those placed in nursing homes could thrive and find life more fulfilling in a non-institutionalized environment. Many older ones currently living in large congregated settings feel threatened and are in fear of succumbing to sickness, neglect or attack of one form or another. Others simply long to enjoy the opportunity to engage the company of younger individuals outside of their diminishing age group. In addition, family members influential in placing older relatives in facilities often feel shame in having had to make such a decision. They also wonder about whether or not their loved ones are being well taken care of in an environment that may be more restrictive.

For these and many other reasons more and more people have strongly considered the advantages of arranging for their loved ones to receive home care over nursing home placement.

Many older ones have lived in their homes for many years and cannot envision relocating. Some have stated, “…don’t send me to a nursing home.” If you are an older adult, you most likely feel a similar way. 

Here are some reasons why home care may be a better option: 

  •       You can be certain that the home care caregiver will provide your mom or dad with individualized care. Unfortunately, that is not the case in nursing homes, where in most cases the residents far outnumber the team of health care providers on staff. As a result, many have complained about their parents not receiving immediate attention from staff members when they need it.
  •       Your parents will likely feel more comfortable in a familiar home environment whether that be their own or that provided by the agency within the community. Nursing homes are devoid of the freedom and independent life choices older ones long to hold on to.  There’s simply no substitute to experiencing the comfort of their favorite chair, the view from a favored spot of the house, and the interactions of those both young and old who stop by to visit to check on them throughout the week. With home care, your parents would truly be able to cherish life’s enriching experiences.
  •       With an at-home caregiver, your parents can continue to take advantage of opportunities and freedoms that are afforded them despite their advancing age and the limitations their health condition might otherwise place on them. The same cannot be said of nursing homes where restrictive policies and procedures significantly limit what residents can and cannot do.  
  •       At home, your parents can enjoy the food that they like. Nursing homes plan meals for vast amounts of people, and on certain days the food may not be to your parent’s liking. While the meals prepared by the caregivers for your parents would be in accord with whatever dietary restrictions their doctor may impose, the meals would nonetheless be tasty because they all contain a dash of love as an underlining ingredient.

In conclusion, before you attempt to persuade your older parents to move into a nursing home, reconsider your options. It might turn out that home care is the most ideal course for you and your parents.

For further assistance with considering your options, please feel free to contact Help Home Care at admin@helphomecare.com.

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Dementia

‘Dementia’ is a term used to describe a wide range of symptoms of cognitive impairment. Witnessing dementia in a parent is one of the hardest things we might face as adults. As we see our parents become dependent and disabled, we confront the vulnerability of someone who at one time we viewed as strong and powerful. There are many types of dementia and managing dementia can be overwhelming. We must balance worry and the realization that roles have changed. To make dealing with this challenge somewhat less difficult, let us get acquainted with three of the most common types of dementia and their symptoms.

3 Common Types of Dementia:

 

Alzheimer’s disease

 

Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia, affecting many Americans over the age of 65.

Symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease

The symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease often mirror signs of common stress, and it can be easy to overlook symptoms for a while, not realizing a bigger problem could be at hand. Though symptoms such as not being able to focus, forgetfulness, and negative attitude, are symptoms that could result from something as simple as not getting enough sleep at night, these are also common indicators of early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Other symptoms of the illness include:

  • Inability to recall numerical sequences like phone numbers and addresses
  • Difficulty planning and solving problems
  • Trouble completing or remembering to do everyday tasks like self-care and chores
  • Forgetting material that you just watched or read, as well as misplacing things often
  • Withdrawing from social situations and changes in personality

Vascular Dementia

Vascular Dementia is a type of dementia that involves impairments in cognitive function caused by damage to blood vessels caused by multiple strokes. Some specialists favor the term “vascular cognitive impairment” (VCI) to “vascular dementia” because they feel it conveys the concept that vascular thinking changes can range from mild to severe.

Symptoms of Vascular Dementia:

The symptoms of vascular dementia depend on the part of the brain affected and the extent of the damage. Similar to Alzheimer’s disease, the symptoms of vascular dementia are often unrecognizable for a long time. They may include:

  • Confusion
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • The decline in the ability to analyze a situation, develop an effective plan and communicate that plan to others
  • Memory loss
  • Significant slowness of thought

 

Lewy Body Dementia

Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) is a progressive brain disorder in which proteins, called alpha-synuclein, accumulate inside certain brain cells. These accumulated proteins, called Lewy bodies, cause damage to brain cells in areas of the brain that affect mental capabilities, behavior, and movement.

Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia

Symptoms of LBD may resemble the symptoms of other neurological disorders. For instance, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Yet, cognitive symptoms tend to show earlier in dementia with Lewy bodies than in Parkinson’s disease dementia. The effects of LBD show in each person differently and vary in severity.

Common symptoms of LBD include:

  • Movement disorders
  • Poor regulation of body functions (autonomic nervous system)
  • Cognitive problems
  • Sleep difficulties
  • Depression

 

While cures for dementia continue to baffle the medical world, that does not stop us from learning about different dementias and adjusting our ways of dealing with those who have it. We want to love and care for those we know with dementia to the best of our abilities.

https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/what-is-dementia

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Honoring Your Parents

Show Honor to Your Mother and Father

Taking good care of your elderly parents will take a lot of time and strength. Make caring for them the main concern, don’t be hesitant to ask for support. Make more time to communicate. You may not always be ready for an unexpected change of circumstances. Maybe think about getting a part-time caretaker. Everyone’s position and what they can do is different. One thing you should always make sure to do is to honor your parents. What are the best ways for you to do that?

Help Support Material Needs 

Honoring your parents might include helping with their material needs. For instance, food, clothing, and shelter. Some may be capable of providing for themselves, which is wonderful. If ever it should come to a point where they are no longer able to take care of their material needs, honor your parents by doing what you can to meet their needs. Not everyone can help others materially. But just doing your best to care for what you can for your parents is greatly appreciated. They do not expect you to do more than what you are capable of.

Acknowledge Emotional Needs

Providing for your parents means more than just providing for their material needs. All of us have emotional needs. Show your gratefulness for all the hard work, love, and care they’ve put into raising you to be the person you are today. Realize that like everyone else, older ones need love and support. We should look for ways to help conserve the dignity of our maturing parents. For example, being a good listener will keep us from insisting on doing things our way without considering their opinions. They need to feel appreciated, and that their lives are still worth living. Show your parents you love them. If they aren’t living with you, remember that your keeping in contact can mean a lot to them. Write them a letter, give them a call, or stop by for a visit. This will bring them so much happiness.

Be Compassionate

As the years move on, older people may find things to be more difficult than they used to be. They may need help. At times, though out of concern, children can become protective and controlling. This can cause parents to resist what they view as efforts to rob them of their independence. They are adults with a life’s worth of experience and wisdom from looking after and making decisions for themselves. Their individuality may center on their role as parents and adults. Parents who feel they have to give up control of their lives to their children could become depressed. It would be nice to let your parents make their own choices when possible. Don’t make decisions about what is best for your parents without speaking to them first. You want them to feel included in the decisions made for them. If they no longer have as many freedoms, you should let them keep the ones they do still have.

Keep a Good Mindset

At times a challenge that adult children have in honoring their parents involves the personal connection they had with their parents in the past. Maybe they were tough, cold or unloving. You might still hold on to anger from the frustration or hurt they’ve caused. How can you overcome these feelings? Try to understand that maybe they had a rough upbringing and have emotional wounds that have caused them to be who they are. Focus on the good in them. Maybe your father never showed you much affection, but you know that he always did what he could to provide for the family’s needs. That is something you can be thankful for. Always show compassion, kindness, mildness, and patience. Continue loving and putting up with one another.